MONTHLY WRAP UP: MARCH

Alright, so I’m beginning to fall behind again with discussion posts and my Goodreads challenge. It seems like every time I come on here I’m complaining about the posts piling up! Oh, well. It’ll get better. Let’s focus on the positive.

Read: 6 novels

  1. 10 Little Indians by Agatha Christie
  2. Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson
  3. Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith
  4. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  5. Naomi and Ely’s No Kiss List by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan
  6. The Alex Crow by Andrew Smith

Reviewed: 4 novels

  1. Fairest: Queen Levana’s Story by Marissa Meyer
  2. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews
  3. Ashes to Ashes by Jenny Han and Vivian Siobhan
  4. Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

Discussed:

  • It’s sad because I didn’t discuss anything. Three next month to make up for it? *crosses fingers*

Book Haul:

  • The Alex Crow by Andrew Smith

Bookish Excitement:

  • 968
  • Author talk: Andrew Smith
  • 4 books behind my Goodreads challenge
  • I’m absolutely in love with the Little Shop of Stories in Decatur right now because they’re having a ton of author events! YES!!

Nonbookish Excitement:

  • I’m a Junior Marshal so I have to help with graduation (ugh), but I get to skip all my exams!
  • …my life is boring…

Monthly Favorites:

  • Read: Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  • Reviewed: Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews
  • Haul: The Alex Crow by Andrew Smith
  • Bookish: Author talk!!

AUTHOR EVENT: ANDREW SMITH

Once again, Little Shop of Stories has shown me that it’s the best book store that could possibly be near me. Another Californian author found themselves on the east coast folded between a Starbucks and a Decatur boutique. Luckily, more and more book tours are happening and Little Shop of Stories seems to have found itself a little niche in the bookish world. Now I don’t have to wait until the Decatur Book Festival or the Yallfest to meet authors.

Back in January, Marissa Meyer made an appearance with the release of Fairest: Queen Levana’s Story. This past Monday, Andrew Smith moseyed down to highlight the release of The Alex Crow and to remind us to “Keep YA Weird” with Penguin’s marketing team.

So we hitched up and headed out on a Monday night to drive the trek (an hour) to Decatur. Where else would be popping on a Monday if not an author signing?

I even called in at work. I was *cough cough* feeling pretty sick… but anyway.

It’s funny how I complain the store’s so far away when I’m fortunate to even have a book store like that within a moderate distance that hosts author signings and book festivals. Either way, I’m not satisfied unless I’m in walking distance, or work there. Or both.

At the Meyer signing, the upstairs was packed to the railing and down the staircase with mostly girls from tweens to adults eagerly holding their collections of the Lunar Chronicles and holding their phones up to take pictures of Meyer as she talked. The place sweltered with bodies and my view was more or less the back of someone’s head.

We cruised in at 6:30ish on Monday night to a book store with a few drowsy customers and my immediate thoughts were that we had the wrong day. I assumed there would be less people, but I didn’t realize the change would be so drastic. They weren’t accepting people upstairs yet, but even so, I expected the book store to be filling up. After wandering the streets to kill some time, we peeked into the store again and the numbers hadn’t grown much. We strolled upstairs without a problem and didn’t have to face the mass bottle-necking of bodies stampeding to the seats.

This time we even got seats because there may have been all of 15 people in there, which I completely loved. This was probably the first author signing I’d been to where I felt like I wasn’t just another audience listening to a lecture; rather, I could hear without a microphone and see Smith without the obstruction of fangirls. A high school kid also interviewed Smith before 7 p.m., and I’m still curious as to how he scored that job.

So while I was disappointed more people didn’t show up for his talk, I selfishly enjoyed having a two minute signing line and feeling like I was in a closer setting than usual.

He read a little bit from his new book and explained how he formulated the premise of the plot. It’s interesting because he said that he doesn’t draft like most authors; rather, he writes all the way through but just makes sure everything is perfect while he goes. He said that’s he’s a disciplines writer and has been writing his entire life. He works as a high school teacher in California, and some of his ideas are spurred from his students. In Grasshopper Jungle, he explained that the only thing he knew going into it was the first scene and an idea that tied in the end of the world with adolescence. I’m still not sure how giant grasshoppers got involved….

I would say he’s been one of my favorite authors to listen to. He didn’t just talk about his book or just about writing. He gave an overview on how he got his ideas and inspirations, how he uses Google to help form his thoughts, and how he underwent the publishing process. I also loved hearing about his editor because I hope to become an editor. I figure I’m not creative enough to become an author, so I can just get my name in small print toward the back and be perfectly happy with helping out with great books.

Plus, as a side note, I only read Grasshopper Jungle about a week ago, and my water bottle broke open in my school bag and spilled over everything. I doctored my book as best as possible with a whole roll of paper towels in accordance with Epic Read’s guidelines, but the beginning pages still stayed a little wavy (I don’t know if you can tell in the picture). I confessed the the damage and worried that I’d be labeled as a book-abuser, but all he said was that Grasshopper Jungle is a moist book, so it’s fitting.:)

Otherwise, I felt like he was super personable and easy to listen to. His talk kept me completely engaged and I loved his reasoning for his books and ideas. I recommend going to hear him even if you haven’t read any of his books, but I know the experience was better for me because I loved his books so much!

CONFESSIONS OF A TEENAGE READER: INK-STAINED HANDS

An idea sparked in my mind, promoted, of course, by a novel. This idea sparked and fizzled away for a while, until I read another novel. And I sat there, and I read a sentence over and over and over. And I needed that quote. And I wanted to remember that quote. And I wrote that quote on my hand, and I looked down at it periodically until it faded into my skin.

And that, my friends, is how my hands became perpetually ink-stained.

Ironically, I can’t remember the quote that made me stop and temporarily tattoo it into my hands. I do remember the book that started it all: We were Liars by E. Lockhart. For some reason, when Cady and her romantic interest (I can’t remember his name…) wrote words on their hands, I loved it. It was romantic. They wrote part of the sentence on the left and part on the right. Always something that would connect together.

So, I read this fantastic quote and I thought, wow, I should write this on my hand.

Let’s back track. Some time ago, I watched this peculiar indie film called A Love Song for Bobby Long. I liked it well enough; it made me minimally uncomfortable, but it was okay. I think about that movie periodically, and for some reason, it’s been pretty influential. Bobby Long was a lost soul who used to be a college professor, and he dramatized everything and could quote long passages from famous writers without hesitation, and I’ve always aspired to be able to quote off the cusp.

And thus the quote jar was born. But I never took the time to find paper, write the quote, and stash it in the jar. I let it sit, collecting dust instead of words, for a year or so.

Flashforward again. Writing on my hands. Somehow, from this movie, the quote jar, and We were Liars, I realized that my arms and hands were perfect mediums to write on and be able to look at each day. For at least a day I’d be able to look down and read and reread these quotes as many times as I wanted. They’re comforting. A little piece of my novel when I can’t read. A snippet of gorgeous words to inspire or evoke emotion. I wish I started this habit when I was in the midst of We were Liars because that book is full of beautiful quotes.

Longer quotes I put on the inside of my forearm because a. that doesn’t wash off as easily as on my hands and b. I, unfortunately, am not ambidextrous, so it’s quite a feat when I write on my right hand. Usually the quotes that I write on both my hands are very short and cute and probably wouldn’t make sense if you hadn’t read the book. It’s like my own little inside jokes. Right now I have “(left) When I found (right) everything romantic” from The Opposite of Loneliness by Marina Keegan. I like the way the quotes are broken in places that should flow. I think it adds to the effect.

Now I’ve been doing this for a good many books, maybe ten or so. Then I got those little bookmarks that are arrows that point to the exact line you stop at. And I had an idea. I’d use those arrows and bookmark the good quotes and write said quote on my hand. Once the book is finished, I’ll pick the best bookmarked quote (maybe a couple, depending on the book) and write it on a more permanent material (like paper) and put it in the dusty quote jar.

Eureka! I now had a system. A tedious, somewhat complicated system that, if attempted to be explained to non-readers or non-romantics they’d ask me the universal question of why? Why would I spend all this time on these words? Why do I want to stain my hands with a never-ending cycle of quotes? What’s so special about them?

Well, my dears, I’ll tell you why. I want to win an argument by quoting a famous writer. I want to look at a piece of artwork in some high-class museum and say to my comrades, “this reminds me of a quote by… ‘…’” In short, I want to have all the tools to be completely pretentious. If I decide to use this power, it’s up to me. But the fact that I can is all that matters.

And I guess in a practical sense I can use it on exams and such in school. But who cares about that?

Anyway, in all seriousness, I just really like words. And, no, it doesn’t completely work. I don’t remember all the quotes I write, and some I do remember aren’t that significant. Here are a couple:

  • “Us fight” –Alice Walker, The Color Purple (this is a quote in dire need of context)
  • “We don’t have a word for the opposite of loneliness, but if we did, I could say that’s what I want in life.” –Marina Keegan, The Opposite of Loneliness
  • “You can find ways to be okay with dying, but you can’t fake your way through living.” –John Corey Whaley, Noggin

And my personal favorite,

  • “The secret of happiness is to see all the marvels of the world and never forget about the drops of oil on the spoon.” –Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist

The Alchemist was loaded with beautiful words and gorgeous quotes, but this is the only one I can recall instantly. I recommend the book, by the way.

I’ve decided, just now, that this can qualify as a hobby, and I adore it immensely. Sometimes I transcribe words that mean specific things to me, or cornerstones in the plot of the novel, or pieces of wisdom, or a beautiful line. I hope I’m not the only one who loves stealing these words.

Do any of you guys have an obsession with quotes? What’s your favorite bookish quote?

WAITING ON WEDNESDAY: THE ART OF LAINEY BY PAULA STROKES

Goodreads Summary:

Soccer star Lainey Mitchell is gearing up to spend an epic summer with her amazing boyfriend, Jason, when he suddenly breaks up with her—no reasons, no warning, and in public no less! Lainey is more than crushed, but with help from her friend Bianca, she resolves to do whatever it takes to get Jason back.

And that’s when the girls stumble across a copy of The Art of War. With just one glance, they’re sure they can use the book to lure Jason back into Lainey’s arms. So Lainey channels her inner warlord, recruiting spies to gather intel and persuading her coworker Micah to pose as her new boyfriend to make Jason jealous. After a few “dates”, it looks like her plan is going to work! But now her relationship with Micah is starting to feel like more than just a game.

What’s a girl to do when what she wants is totally different from what she needs? How do you figure out the person you’re meant to be with, if you’re still figuring out the person you’re meant to be?

Sometimes, a girl just wants a nice, fluffy contemporary novel to curl up in, and this one looks especially unique. I’m interested in The Art of War reference, and I wonder how Strokes will add that element in without getting confusing. All the reviews have been fabulous, and I can’t wait to read it!

WAITING ON WEDNESDAY: DOROTHY MUST DIE BY DANIELLE PAGE

Goodreads Summary:

I didn’t ask for any of this. I didn’t ask to be some kind of hero.
But when your whole life gets swept up by a tornado—taking you with it—you have no choice but to go along, you know?

Sure, I’ve read the books. I’ve seen the movies. I know the song about the rainbow and the happy little blue birds. But I never expected Oz to look like this. To be a place where Good Witches can’t be trusted, Wicked Witches may just be the good guys, and winged monkeys can be executed for acts of rebellion. There’s still the yellow brick road, though—but even that’s crumbling.

What happened?
Dorothy. They say she found a way to come back to Oz. They say she seized power and the power went to her head. And now no one is safe.

My name is Amy Gumm—and I’m the other girl from Kansas.
I’ve been recruited by the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked.
I’ve been trained to fight.
And I have a mission:
Remove the Tin Woodman’s heart.
Steal the Scarecrow’s brain.
Take the Lion’s courage.
Then and only then—Dorothy must die!

On April 1, 2014 we’ll get to see the aftermath of Dorothy’s trip to Oz. I’m in love with all things Wizard of Oz, I must have read the original at least three times, and now a perfect and different Young Adult spin-off has made it into the world!

The cover, first of all, is amazing. The premise is super interesting. How can you not want to know how Dorothy became corrupted?! The first three chapters were available on EpicReads, but I didn’t want to spoil anything for myself before I’m able to read the whole thing!

Everything about this book screams perfection, and I can’t wait until it comes out!

WAITING ON WEDNESDAY: CRESS (LUNAR CHRONICLES #3) BY MARISSA MEYER

One year ago, almost to this date, I knew nothing about the beauty of the Lunar Chronicles or the fantastic way Marissa Meyer ties in fairy tales with dystopias. I wish I could have found Cinder sooner, but alas, I procrastinated to read the book until I “just happened” to see it on the way out of the library (destiny, I’d like to call it).

In a way, it was a good thing I read Cinder late, because I didn’t have to wait for Scarlet. Now, I’ve been wandering aimlessly around this bleak world craving lunar-people and my favorite fairy tale characters. Thankfully, the wait is almost over. When everyone else was receiving ARCs of this book, I cringed and looked away in jealousy. I didn’t want to spoil my appetite. Oh no, I want to plunge into Meyer’s world without finding out one thing about the plot. And now my greedy hands can almost feel the crackling of Cress‘s new spine. That moment will be the end of my starvation for the next addition of the Lunar Chronicles. That is, until I finish Cress and have to wait another YEAR for Winter.

Okay, I’ll admit that I did read the first chapter. But only the first! How could I not!? This is by far on my list of favorite series.

  1. Harry Potter (duh)
  2. Percy Jackson/ Heroes of Olympus
  3. Lunar Chronicles

I’ve found some series usually get progressively worse. So far, this hasn’t happened in the Lunar Chronicles, and I hope it never will.

Not to mention the gorgeous covers of all three books.

How amazing do these look!? I’ll be the first to admit it: I judge a book by its cover. Not solely on its cover, but that is a major reason for picking it up.

EEPP!! I’m so excited for this book!!

The Goodreads summary:

Rapunzel’s tower is a satellite. She can’t let down her hair—or her guard. 

In this third book in the bestselling Lunar Chronicles series, Cinder and Captain Thorne are fugitives on the run, with Scarlet and Wolf in tow. Together, they’re plotting to overthrow Queen Levana and her army. 

Their best hope lies with Cress, who has been trapped on a satellite since childhood with only her netscreens as company. All that screen time has made Cress an excellent hacker—unfortunately, she’s just received orders from Levana to track down Cinder and her handsome accomplice. 

When a daring rescue goes awry, the group is separated. Cress finally has her freedom, but it comes at a high price. Meanwhile, Queen Levana will let nothing stop her marriage to Emperor Kai. Cress, Scarlet, and Cinder may not have signed up to save the world, but they may be the only ones who can.

Doesn’t it sound amazing? I actually don’t physically own the other two, but I’m planning on buying and rereading both before starting Cress.

It should be out on February 4th, and I’ve already marked the date!

I. Can. Not. Wait!