TOP TEN BOOKS ON MY FALL TBR LIST

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s topic is all the books on our to-read lists. I actually don’t have a lot of timely books this season.

  1. Winger by Andrew Smith (I want to reread this for the sequel)
  2. Stand-Off by Andrew Smith
  3. The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
  4. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neal Hurston
  5. More Happy than Not by Adam Silvera
  6. The Diviners by Libba Bray
  7. Wicked by Gregory Maguire
  8. Hello, I Love You by Katie Stout
  9. Falling into Place by Amy Zhang
  10. Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

TOP TEN FINISHED SERIES I HAVE YET TO FINISH

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s topic focus on the series that we haven’t finished yet, and this basically encompassing every book I’ve ever read. I’m not dedicated enough to finish series. Honestly, some of these series may not be finished yet, but I know that I won’t finish them.

  1. Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi
  2. Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo
  3. The Program by Suzanne Young
  4. Matched by Allie Condie
  5. Delirium by Lauren Oliver
  6. The Maze Runner by James Dashner
  7. If I Stay by Gayle Forman
  8. Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
  9. Mortal Instruments by Cassandra Clare
  10. Legend by Marie Lu

CRABBY CONVERSATIONS: MAKE TIME

I’ve come to the realization that I have a lot of pet peeves. And I rant quite often about these pet peeves.

I thought of another one the other day that goes along with my whole, you know, book blog. I kind of feel like I’ve already talked about this before, but I couldn’t find anything like it in my posts, so maybe I’ve just complained about it to my friends. So now I can complain about it to you guys!

I think an example best explains it:

Person: Wow, you read? That’s so cool! I love reading. I read all the time.

Me: Really? What’s your favorite book?

Person: Oh, you know, [insert middle-grade staple book here].

Me: Yeah I liked that a lot in elementary school too….

Person: I haven’t read a book in so long…. I can’t actually remember the last time I read a book not for school. I just don’t have time to read anymore.

Me: …but… you said you liked reading…

Please refrain from having any conversations similar to this with me. I will pull my hair out.

If you loved reading or wanted to read or even liked reading, you would make time for it. Do not tell me you don’t have time! I take 4 AP classes and journalism and creative writing and write a column for a magazine and have a part-time job and go out with friends and run a blog… But I still make time to read. Because I love reading.  So if you “love” reading, you can make time.

But I get it if reading is not a priority. That’s fine. That’s your prerogative. But please do not tell me that you love reading when you don’t read. The fact that you enjoyed reading when you were a child and teachers forced you to is completely different from enjoying reading now. If you’re busy doing other things and would rather do something else like play sports or watch TV, then go ahead. But that means reading is not on your radar, so you must not love it as much as you supposedly do. You do not read all the time if you can’t remember the last book you read for leisure. And your favorite book still has pictures in it.

If you liked reading so much, you would make it a priority. I understand that not everyone wants to do this, but do not tell me you love something that you never do.

Alright, my rant is over. I feel like this post has a lot of anger in it. Whoops?

Is this a pet peeve for any of you guys? Or is it just me being unnecessarily hostile?

MONTHLY WRAP UPS: SUMMER

Alright, so I slacked on my wrap-ups. Conveniently, it was all the summer months that I missed, so here goes an all-in-one finishing post to summarize my summer. I definitely didn’t read as many books as I should have, and I’m way behind on my books to review and Goodreads challenge, but oh well.

Read: 14 novels

  1. Off the Page by Jodi Picoult and Samantha Van Leer
  2. Mosquitoland by David Arnold
  3. The Art of Lainey by Paula Stokes
  4. To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han
  5. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Johnathan Safran Foer
  6. Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson
  7. The Future of Us by Jay Asher
  8. The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger
  9. The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation by M. T. Anderson
  10. Elsewhere by Gabrielle Zevin
  11. The Beautiful and the Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  12. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  13. The Puppet Turners of Narrow Interior by Stephanie Barbe Hammer
  14. Macbeth by William Shakespeare

Reviewed: 5 novels

  1. Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith
  2. Off the Page by Jodi Picoult and Samantha Van Leer
  3. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Johnathan Safran Foer
  4. Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson
  5. The Beautiful and the Damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Mini Reviews: 3 novels

  1. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  2. Simon vs. the Homo Sapien Agenda by Becky Albertalli
  3. Naomi and Ely’s No Kiss List by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan

Discussed:

  • Crabby Conversations: Spontaneous Road Trip
  • Confessions of a Teenage Reader: The Inevitable Hiatus
  • Confessions of a Teenage Reader: Beautiful Little Birdy
  • Crabby Conversations: The Bookish Patriarchy

Book Haul: 17 novels

  • Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  • The Stranger by Albert Camus
  • Even the Stars Look Lonesome by Maya Angelou
  • Wise Blood by Flannery O’Connor
  • The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros
  • The Pearl by John Steinbeck
  • The Plague by Albert Camus
  • The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand
  • The Underdogs by Markus Zusak
  • 100 Sideways Miles by Andrew Smith
  • Their Eyes were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
  • Liars, Inc by Paula Stokes
  • The Marbury Lens by Andrew Smith
  • One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest by Ken Kesey
  • The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
  • Wicked by Gregory Maguire
  • Summer of the Oak Moon by Laura Templeton

Bookish Excitement: 

  • YALL Festival and Decatur Book Festival released their author line-ups.
  • Jodi Picoult and Samantha Van Leer held a signing sponsored by The Little Shop of Stories for their new book Off the Page.
  • 995 Bookmarks
  • Little Shop is hosting a good many author events coming in October and I’m super pumped!

Non-Bookish Excitement: 

I, surprisingly, had a very eventful summer without doing much…

  • Tybee Island and Orange Beach trip
  • Nashville trip to visit Vanderbilt (the campus and the school are both perfect, by the way)
  • It’s been the summer of concerts: Dave Matthews Band, Train, Fall Out Boy
  • Zoo Atlanta… twice

Guys, the summer has been beautiful and full of everything and I’m ready for it to be over but I’m also not ready to go back to school. Just think about it. I’m a senior now. This is it. You spend three years getting comfortable, one year to enjoy the glory, and the process begins again. Scary, right? I guess that’s just how it will always be. Cyclical to a fault. Anyway. Let’s see if I can even begin to pick the best parts out of the summer…

Summer Favorites:

  • Read: Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson– How can I not pick this one? It’s a summer anthem book.
  • Reviewed: Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Johnathan Safran Foer
  • Mini Review: Naomi and Ely’s No Kiss List by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan
  • Discussed: The Bookish Patriarchy
  • Haul: 100 Sideways Miles by Andrew Smith
  • Bookish: Guys. I’m five bookmarks away from reaching 1,000. Five.
  • Non-Bookish: The concert string– specifically Dave Matthews and Train.

CRABBY CONVERSATIONS: THE BOOKISH PATRIARCHY

I think I have a niche, which is something that I would never want to admit. All my favorite books seem to have the same basic elements.

  • Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime by Mark Haddon
  • I am the Messenger by Markus Zusak
  • Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  • Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
  • The Stranger by Albert Camus
  • Winger by Andrew Smith

And if you haven’t noticed the trends yet, I’ll point them out to you.

  1. Written by guys
  2. Written about guys
  3. First person
  4. Contemporary
  5. Mundane settings but original perspectives
  6. Focus on thoughts rather than events

The thing that kills me about these trends are the first two. It’s agonizing. I’m feeding into the patriarchy! Where’s my feminist punch? I can’t help which books I like…. But I did come up with a theory of why this happens.

Alright, here comes a nice little rant.

So books had a long period of segregation that still has remnants in today’s society. Girl vs. guy books. Mostly, though, it was a one way street. Girls can read guy books, but guys could not read girl books. If the protagonist was female, they were not having any of that. Yet could you blame them? Female protagonists implied domestic family problems and romance while guy books could range from self realization to destroying alien planets. Nobody saw any girls developing themselves individually or saving worlds.

And thus the dystopian fad was born.

Female authors put on their big girl pants and decided their female protagonists were going to fight evil in fiction world and bring down the patriarchy in reality with girls who can pack a punch. She can do anything guys can do… but better. Now girls have overrun the action world in young adult literature and have successfully beaten out male dominance in this genre. Except for one crutch that remains. The boyfriend.

The boyfriend is the dreaded subplot that threatens to overthrow the actual issues in these books every single time. Sometimes it succeeds (ehm, Hunger Games), but sometimes it remains to be just a beautiful little subplot to keep readers blushing and hearts fluttering.

But here’s the thing. When a male author is writing for a male audience with a male protagonist in an action book, he doesn’t need a romance. When a female author is writing for a female audience with a female protagonist in an action book, she doesn’t need a romance. But there is the inevitable placement of a romance for the appeasement of the teen girls reading the book and the stereotype that goes along with what they like and don’t like. It’s the shreds of bookish segregation that persists into present day. Female protagonists have yet to shake the shackles of their ancestors in that respect. Because now teenage girls can appreciate a powerful heroine, but of course they still want the beautiful romance as well.

Then there’s me who resents this trend. Don’t get me wrong, I love romance as much as anybody and I am all for girl power, but these just aren’t my favorite things to read. I appreciate a good world and valiant fight scenes, but my favorite books are ones that I can quote. Books that have more than excitement and romance. All my top choices may not be the most action packed or creative, but they’re original. They have meaning and characters with realistic dimension.

But I hate it. I hate the fact that none of these characters are females! Or written by women! It kills me every time and I sit here and try to shove a book with a female protagonist into nabbing a spot on my list, but it never happens. And there’s my theory on why. Male authors have nothing to prove with their male characters, while female authors have to break stereotypes and make sure their girls are independent and self sufficient. Guys just seem to have more openings available and have no needs for the boy/girlfriend crutch.

Rant over. I’ll keep my eyes peeled for books in my niche written by and about females, and hopefully one that interests me pops up soon. And hopefully the boyfriend subplot is nonexistent or subtle at most.

CRABBY CONVERSATIONS: SPONTANEOUS ROAD TRIP!

I have a grand idea. Let’s jump into a snazzy little clunker and rev the engine into the distance. Let’s follow the sunset with a can of money and a drawstring bag of clothes. Pack light because things will work out on the way. Let’s not plan anything and focus on the objective. Let’s see the Northern Lights, let’s visit our long-lost lover, let’s just seek adventure and because we’re on a road trip we’ll find it. See a hitchhiker? Pick him up. See a road sign for the biggest block of cheese in the Western Hemisphere? Pull off. This is a road trip and we have all summer and our phones are nowhere to be found because those sedentary people are just holding us back.

Sounds implausible, reckless, and a generally awful idea, right? Wrong. Because this is fiction and we can do whatever the heck we want and nothing too terrible will happen unless we want it to.

Road trip books absolutely baffle me because they’re considered contemporary fiction. Realistic. I think I would categorize them as fantasy, because how does everything work out perfectly? How does adventure just kick you in the face? How is the road trip not just sleepy hours in a car with disgruntled occupants?

And I have one question, just one– where are your parents? If they know about your trip, how are they okay with it? If they don’t, how did you possibly deceive them of something this big? (alright that was more than one question)

But, seriously. I wish my parents caved to my reckless whims and allowed for my craving for adventure be satisfied by a road trip.

The thing is, despite the absolute absurdity of these trips and the complete unrealisticness of this niche, I love this books. I love them so much.

I think it’s my wistfulness. I would adore going on a road trip. The more spontaneous, the more fun. I’ve always wanted to have interesting things and interesting people fall into my life, and I’ve dreamed of breaking out of suburbia and into something real. Yet this books aren’t real… But they are what I wish was real. If that makes any sense.

So, yes. Road trip books are unrealistic. Completely fantasy. But somehow the valiant road-trippers find love and fulfillment and excitement and sorrow and everything in between. It’s the classic Hero’s Journey, but in contemporary terms.

But here’s the thing.

I hate the classic Hero’s Journey of trumping through woods and fighting evil with swords and magical powers and gaining alliances.

Yet I love the contemporary Hero’s Journey of driving down the highway of escaping sticky situations with wit and luck and meeting people from the forgotten folds of the world.

MONTHLY WRAP UPS: APRIL

Read: 4 novels

  1. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
  2. Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
  3. Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  4. Takeoff: Looking Beyond the Clouds by Austin Jackson

Reviewed: 3 books

  1. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
  2. There’s No Place like Oz by Danielle Paige
  3. Killer Cruise by Jennifer Shaw

Discussed:

  • Crabby Conversations: Just Don’t Read It

Book Haul:

  1. Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  2. Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
  3. Mosquitoland by David Arnold
  4. Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum

     

    How could I resist this beautiful cover? (Plus it was only $6)

  5. Between the Lines by Jodi Picoult and Samantha Van Leer
  6. Off the Page by Jodi Picoult and Samantha Van Leer
  7. Vanishing Acts by Jodi Picoult
  8. To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han
  9. Catch-22 by Joesph Heller

Wow, I actually got quite a bit of books this month! The haul has only been around 1-3 lately.

Bookish Excitement:

  • 972 Bookmarks
  • Author Event: Little Shop Launch Party
  • 8 books behind on Goodreads Challenge

Non-bookish Excitement:

  • Death Cab for Cutie concert!
  • Dogwood Festival
  • Tybee day trip #SB2k15
  • Standardized testing and exams! My favorite!

Monthly Favorites:

  • Read: Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
  • Reviewed: There’s No Place like Oz by Danielle Paige
  • Discussed: Just Don’t Read It
  • Haul: Off the Page by Jodi Picoult and Samantha Van Leer– Alright, so there’s a reason that this is my favorite out of my uncharacteristically large haul. Random House sent me an ARC of this book with the cutest little presentation, and (unlike some of the bigger bloggers) I’m not rolling in ARCs and publisher-sent books, so needless to say I was pretty pumped.
  • Bookish Excitement: Little Shop Launch Party
  • Nonbookish Excitement: Death Cab for Cutie concert

AUTHOR EVENT: LITTLE SHOP LAUNCH PARTY

I did something out of the ordinary over the weekend. I went to an author event (which isn’t the crazy part)….

I went to an author event without reading the book first.

*cue the shame*

In my defense, it was a launch party, so the book only came out like three or so days before the event. I know the more hardcore readers would have already read and reviewed the book, but I just decided that I would buy the book once I got there. Plus I had to buy a book to get one signed, so it worked out.

Basically, we did the usual routine with a bit more flexibility since it was on a Saturday instead of a random Monday night. My parents and I went to the Dogwood Festival in the afternoon and went over to Decatur of dinner before the event. I bought the first (two) books of the launch party, just sayin’.

It was actually quite an adorable event. Usually we head upstairs and listen to the author talk about whatever he/she wants to talk about, then we go downstairs to a signing line and jump back into our cars. This time, we stayed downstairs and they had Oreo cookies and milk and alcohol-soaked stacks of more Oreo cookies. And wine. Don’t forget the wine.

Can you guess the book? Published in April, revolves around chocolate cookies with creme filling…

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Plus it had a gorgeous display.

Anyway, I really enjoyed the event. My friend met me there, and we stood in the back surrounded by all Becky’s friends who came out to support her book release. You could tell that she was a first-time author and didn’t have the whole author-event thing down just yet, but I liked that about her. It was interesting to see how surreal the whole process was for her, and I felt like seeing a debut author gives young writers more confidence and makes their goal to write a novel more realistic.

Also, let’s talk about how she said it took her all of 6 months to write, edit, and sign her book. Oh my gosh! It took me 6 months just to think of a blog title and actually start writing book reviews!

She did a question/ answer session and signed books, and you could just tell how excited she was about her book being published. The complete opposite of a snobby writer. She thanked her friends and family a million times in the beginning, and I loved seeing her whole support system. It also made me feel a bit like I was intruding, but, hey, when she’s the next John Green I can boast about being at her first launch party. And she’s writing another book now, so I could totally see that happening. 

As I said earlier, I usually don’t go to bookish events if I haven’t read the spotlighted book or author. It always feels fake to me, like I’m pretending to be a fan of something I haven’t even read yet. But I had been seeing Simon on pretty much every platform that has anything to do with young adult literature, and I couldn’t wait to get my hands on it. How could I resist a launch party!?

I had already read reviews and searched her author blog and watched a Tea Time episode that interviewed her literary agent, so I would say that I did know a bit of Simon and Becky trivia before going. Which sounds creepy, now that I think about it. But it’ll be okay.

Point being, the excitement I had for this book was unreal. I cannot tell you guys enough how much I appreciate The Little Shop of Stories, because they do the cutest events, and the Decatur Book Festival used to be the bookish event that became my lifeline to hold me over until next year. And now they’re doing all sorts of different events, and I’m currently making it my job to go to as many as I possibly can. I may or may not pull up their events page just about as often as I check Twitter. You know, just to chill, see what’s up in Decatur… make sure I’m not missing any authors.

Speaking of, in addition to meeting the lovely Becky Albertalli, her friend David Arnold, author of Mosquitoland also popped in to support her. I cannot even tell you how many times I’ve walked across the beautiful cover of Mosquitoland and had to pick it up just to see what it felt like to hold a work of art in my hands. I haven’t done quite the extensive research on his book as I did Simon, but it still had a nice glowing spot on my TBR list. I didn’t really think I would be reading it anytime soon (I’m cheap, I don’t buy hardbacks… or full-priced paperbacks… Basically I will not buy a book over $6 unless it’s signed). So needless to say I was pumped to get the extra little gift of Mosquitoland in addition to Simon and meeting both authors who are wonderful down-to-earth people.

So please, if you don’t go to author events or festivals or anything, find yourself an adorable bookstore and get involved in this community! Everyone is always so nice and it’s really a lot of fun. Writers are awesome, but readers are the life of the party!:)

And a little sidnote: I just finished Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda and it is all the adorableness rolled into a cute modern narrator, rounded friends, and a meaningful plot. More on the book with the review!

MONTHLY WRAP UP: MARCH

Alright, so I’m beginning to fall behind again with discussion posts and my Goodreads challenge. It seems like every time I come on here I’m complaining about the posts piling up! Oh, well. It’ll get better. Let’s focus on the positive.

Read: 6 novels

  1. 10 Little Indians by Agatha Christie
  2. Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson
  3. Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith
  4. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  5. Naomi and Ely’s No Kiss List by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan
  6. The Alex Crow by Andrew Smith

Reviewed: 4 novels

  1. Fairest: Queen Levana’s Story by Marissa Meyer
  2. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews
  3. Ashes to Ashes by Jenny Han and Vivian Siobhan
  4. Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

Discussed:

  • It’s sad because I didn’t discuss anything. Three next month to make up for it? *crosses fingers*

Book Haul:

  • The Alex Crow by Andrew Smith

Bookish Excitement:

  • 968
  • Author talk: Andrew Smith
  • 4 books behind my Goodreads challenge
  • I’m absolutely in love with the Little Shop of Stories in Decatur right now because they’re having a ton of author events! YES!!

Nonbookish Excitement:

  • I’m a Junior Marshal so I have to help with graduation (ugh), but I get to skip all my exams!
  • …my life is boring…

Monthly Favorites:

  • Read: Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  • Reviewed: Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews
  • Haul: The Alex Crow by Andrew Smith
  • Bookish: Author talk!!

AUTHOR EVENT: ANDREW SMITH

Once again, Little Shop of Stories has shown me that it’s the best book store that could possibly be near me. Another Californian author found themselves on the east coast folded between a Starbucks and a Decatur boutique. Luckily, more and more book tours are happening and Little Shop of Stories seems to have found itself a little niche in the bookish world. Now I don’t have to wait until the Decatur Book Festival or the Yallfest to meet authors.

Back in January, Marissa Meyer made an appearance with the release of Fairest: Queen Levana’s Story. This past Monday, Andrew Smith moseyed down to highlight the release of The Alex Crow and to remind us to “Keep YA Weird” with Penguin’s marketing team.

So we hitched up and headed out on a Monday night to drive the trek (an hour) to Decatur. Where else would be popping on a Monday if not an author signing?

I even called in at work. I was *cough cough* feeling pretty sick… but anyway.

It’s funny how I complain the store’s so far away when I’m fortunate to even have a book store like that within a moderate distance that hosts author signings and book festivals. Either way, I’m not satisfied unless I’m in walking distance, or work there. Or both.

At the Meyer signing, the upstairs was packed to the railing and down the staircase with mostly girls from tweens to adults eagerly holding their collections of the Lunar Chronicles and holding their phones up to take pictures of Meyer as she talked. The place sweltered with bodies and my view was more or less the back of someone’s head.

We cruised in at 6:30ish on Monday night to a book store with a few drowsy customers and my immediate thoughts were that we had the wrong day. I assumed there would be less people, but I didn’t realize the change would be so drastic. They weren’t accepting people upstairs yet, but even so, I expected the book store to be filling up. After wandering the streets to kill some time, we peeked into the store again and the numbers hadn’t grown much. We strolled upstairs without a problem and didn’t have to face the mass bottle-necking of bodies stampeding to the seats.

This time we even got seats because there may have been all of 15 people in there, which I completely loved. This was probably the first author signing I’d been to where I felt like I wasn’t just another audience listening to a lecture; rather, I could hear without a microphone and see Smith without the obstruction of fangirls. A high school kid also interviewed Smith before 7 p.m., and I’m still curious as to how he scored that job.

So while I was disappointed more people didn’t show up for his talk, I selfishly enjoyed having a two minute signing line and feeling like I was in a closer setting than usual.

He read a little bit from his new book and explained how he formulated the premise of the plot. It’s interesting because he said that he doesn’t draft like most authors; rather, he writes all the way through but just makes sure everything is perfect while he goes. He said that’s he’s a disciplines writer and has been writing his entire life. He works as a high school teacher in California, and some of his ideas are spurred from his students. In Grasshopper Jungle, he explained that the only thing he knew going into it was the first scene and an idea that tied in the end of the world with adolescence. I’m still not sure how giant grasshoppers got involved….

I would say he’s been one of my favorite authors to listen to. He didn’t just talk about his book or just about writing. He gave an overview on how he got his ideas and inspirations, how he uses Google to help form his thoughts, and how he underwent the publishing process. I also loved hearing about his editor because I hope to become an editor. I figure I’m not creative enough to become an author, so I can just get my name in small print toward the back and be perfectly happy with helping out with great books.

Plus, as a side note, I only read Grasshopper Jungle about a week ago, and my water bottle broke open in my school bag and spilled over everything. I doctored my book as best as possible with a whole roll of paper towels in accordance with Epic Read’s guidelines, but the beginning pages still stayed a little wavy (I don’t know if you can tell in the picture). I confessed the the damage and worried that I’d be labeled as a book-abuser, but all he said was that Grasshopper Jungle is a moist book, so it’s fitting.:)

Otherwise, I felt like he was super personable and easy to listen to. His talk kept me completely engaged and I loved his reasoning for his books and ideas. I recommend going to hear him even if you haven’t read any of his books, but I know the experience was better for me because I loved his books so much!