WHY YOU SHOULD READ BOOK EVERYDAY

In the modern life, we can change habits from reading book to surfing news or magazine on social internet. We can’t deny convenience of the internet for our lives. But there are a few benefits from reading book which the internet can’t replace anyway.

Here are significant benefits from reading book. It is answer for reason why you should read book every day.

1/ Improve knowledge effectively.

Reading can fill in your head with new bits of information more effectively than you see information directly from the screen laptop or smart phone.

It can explain that using the internet for searching information, you are easy to be neglected other news from Facebook, Instagram or Zalo. While reading books can customize focusing on words. You are not disturbed by others.

2/ Improve vocabulary effectively.

The more you read, the more words you access to so your vocabulary expands day by day. If you focus on reading and writing, you are convenient to take note new words in your book.

Reading books is also vital for learning new languages and updating news of literature, scientific breakthroughs or global events. It supports not only your job but also makes you more confident with bigger vocabulary.

3/ Improve memory effectively.

When you read a book, you have to remember an assortment of the previous information. It’s great to practice your brain better.

Strengthening memory boost your brain bath-way longer and further.

4/ Improve mood better.

In a busy life, you have to face up with many stresses from work, personal relationships or issues in daily life. Reading book is a great choice to forget pressure outside and upgrade your mood better.

A well-written book will leads you to another world, then reduce tensions and relax in your mind. It seems a mystery drug to cure for your soul.

Top best book for IELTS

If you are looking the best IELTS books to improve your English level in the next test?

If you are confusing about the best way to learn IELTS for new beginner?

Sure that this article is useful for your purpose. Here’s is presentation about Top best book for IELTS which helps you to achieve the good results in IELTS as expectation.

Rank first: The Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS

This book should be read before studying higher level because it is officially published by the producer of the IELTS exam. According to review of examinee, it is a must-have book to get the high score in the exam.

A DVD is included with book so that you can practice enough 4 skills: listening, reading, writing and speaking. The main purpose is to guide the students to the better approach way for each skill. These sharing is based on both the personal experience of the writers and the candidates who get high score for IELTS exam.

2nd: Barron’s IELTS Superpack

It is called a super manual book. It includes in three manuals and two audio CDs respectively.

An impressive feature from this book is separating tips and tricks for each exercises referred. This extremely useful book also provides fundamental samples, practice task and exercise sheets.

3rd: Target Band 7: IELTS Academic

The author of this book is Simone Braverman who is a former test-taker. According to her experience during IELTS studying and testing process, she has deeply understood about specific difficulties and troubles. She accesses to solutions to the typical problems besides useful tips and techniques for each exercise.

4th: Cambridge IELTS 11 Self-Study Pack

This book comes with series of answers and questions which you have to face in the IELTS exam. These correct answers for query help you to improve more knowledge.

Further, it also supplies with the samples of the previous year exam pattern and questions as value document for reference.

Top 5 book review website for reader

Book plays an important role in society development. In the modern technology, we can take advantages of improvement to choose good book for yourselves. We can combine computers, devices, and the internet to consider author pages, book blogs, content or interaction with reader. There are some sites for book-lovers so that they can discuss and exchange opinion, review or feedback about books. It’s useful to consider before you decide to buy a physical book

Here are 5 perfect sites to recommend about book review

1, Goodreads

You need to register an account on Goodreads so that you can use all effect and functions as a true bookworm. It is on the top best book review because it is professionally designed with other fields, including: tracking all kind of books, giving discussions about books or joining reading group

2, Literary Hub

It almost focuses reviews about daily literary news. It is a social network to connect writers, publishers, books, bookstores, librarians and readers. If you are caring about literary, Literary Hub is the best choice because they have the latest news and books in literary.

3, BookBub

Here is the best website for big fans of physical field. The outstanding feature is updating discounted digital book by email. You can easily customize your demand based on Bookbud’s recommendations

4, LibraryThing

On Librarything, you can make the catalogue of books online. So, you feel convenient to track and check your request. It’s also a reliable place to review books, join reading groups or exchange information about bookish

5, Page-Turner

It’s considered as a huge resource of book criticism and conversation. You can find any kind of book on this websiteAlso other book review sites, it has enough field like tracking, reviews, interviews and specially book round ups. It can meet your satisfactions

Top of the best book review

From when you were a student, you were taught about importance of book. Books make us better in communication. Books educate and broaden knowledge about life. Books also motivate you better. Sometimes people find books to reduce stress and get balance between mental and physical

 

Generally, books play a vital role. However, not at all we are ready to pay money to buy any book. Sure that all books are valuable. But you can’t exactly forecast that it fits to you or not. Having a suggestion is checking out the reviews of what other readers have said from the online social networking. It helps you to determine if it is worth to read or not or from the reviews, you can widen more information in this book

Here is some recommendation about book review for you

1: Booktv

The strength of Booktv is reviews for non-fiction books. These kind of books are popular with people. Reviews make you clearer about the content. Besides it, there are some comments to instruct you how the best way reads it

2: New York Times Book Review Podcasts

It includes in fiction and non-fiction authors. The magazine editor of Podcast open shows discussions about hot topic such as interviews with authors Jennifer Egan or what is the best- selling book recently

3: Fireside Book Chat

It has discussions about mystery, non-fiction, poetry, sports, and fantasy books which set up as classroom with school topic

This web is really attracted by students. It considers as a forum to interact and connect students closer and closer

4th: Science Fiction Book Review Podcast

If you are lover of fiction book, join this group immediately. There are available fiction book from contemporary to now, some books are classic which valued in history

Readers give their personal views and insight about meanings, functions and feature of science fiction books

New books recommended by The New York Times

Reading books is the easiest way we escape from stresses in life and refresh ourselves for the new days. Nothing can be compared to reading a good book, so it would be nice if we are recommended with interesting books every week.

Why not coming to some suggestions by The New York Times, one of the most notable newspapers in the world. There are some outstanding new books that The New York Times advises us to read now, mentioned one by one below.

The Old Drift by Namwali Serpell

Kết quả hình ảnh cho The Old Drift by Namwali Serpell

The book is a story of three intertwined families, the white, the black and the one as the product of the interracial marriage. The author made this story interesting and sincere with the engagement of historical factors and scientific factors. The book is a discussion about political, psychological and social status related issues. Many critics have viewed this as an intimate and brainy epic and seem to be impressed by the book tremendously.

HATTIESBURG: An American City in Black and White by William Sturkey

Kết quả hình ảnh cho HATTIESBURG: An American City in Black and White by William Sturkey

This is a portrait about Mississippi from its foundation dated back in 1882 to the movement of civil rights. This book gives us the most intimate approach to its targeted readers, the residents of Hattiesburg and also any of us who got interested in the American social in the past.

Also recommended THE PROMISE OF ELSEWHERE by Brad Leithauser, DOING JUSTICE: A Prosecutor’s Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law by Preet Bharara, and THE DEVIL ASPECT by Craig Russell.

Do you want to know more interesting books, programs and movie reviews? Follow us to get more updates about things that light up your day and make your life more meaningful. Nourish your mind and heal the soul with books that can change your whole life.

Top 4 best self-help books of all time

1. “The Greatest Salesman in the World” by Og Mandino

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After serving in the Second World War, Og Mandino suffered from severe alcoholism as well as commercial trafficking. When his wife and children left, he had committed suicide, but he saw some self-help books before deciding to end his life. It was he who said, what he read then changed his life completely, and it also helped him get rid of alcoholism. He later became a great author and he also produced the masterpiece “The Greatest Salesman in the World” (self-help book) in 1968.

“The Greatest Salesman in the World” is a long journey of Hafid, a poor camel boy, in ancient Jerusalem. The young man learned some secrets from a wealthy businessman and succeeded to become a great salesman.

So far, “The Greatest Salesman in the World” has been translated into 25 languages ​​and has sold over 50 million copies, becoming one of the best-selling books in the world.

2. The Road less traveled

M. Scott Peck, psychiatrist, known for his 1978 “The Road less traveled “. In this book, Peck talked about how to improve one’s life, giving a lot of thought to love and relationships. Peck says that the common misconception of people is that they always see love relationships as the means to “achieve” rather than trying to understand them to “give”. The love that he wants to convey is to nurture and understand others. Peck also emphasizes the importance of self-discipline and in order to achieve success in life, we need to solve our own problems as well as seek to overcome the challenges ourselves. He wrote in his book, “Only through problems can we mature intellectually and mentally.”

3. “I dare you” by William H. Danforth

William H. Danforth founded Nestle Purina (before merging with Nestle in 2001 Purina mills) in 1894. He thought that life was just like a game. Danforth emphasized that four important elements (or “squares”) are: intellectual, physical, social and religious; Always be balanced to be successful in life. All his thoughts and ideas are summarized in “I dare you” published more than 70 years ago. He encourages all readers, at any age, to seize the opportunity and trust in their own potential.

4. “Think and grow rich” by Napoleon Hill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This classic self-help book was first published in 1937 – the peak of the recession – and has so far been one of the best-selling books of all time. To write this book, Napoleon Hill studied the life and work of 40 millionaires to discover the secret of their success. From there, he learned about their decades of accumulated experience to introduce to the readers.

SERIES REVIEW: WINGER AND STAND-OFF BY ANDREW SMITH

 

I have read Winger twice. And it is the only book that has made me uncontrollably sob. Twice.

Winger is about Ryan Dean West, a 14 year old junior at a northwestern boarding school for rich kids. Somehow, he got put in the “bad kids” dorm, rooming with the bully of his rugby team and across the hall from burly football players. And he’s in love with Annie, his best friend. Life gets pretty complicated at Pine Mountain Academy, but he manages to make it all work out between his friends and rugby and comics. But nothing could prepare him for what the end of the year brought, and his world comes tumbling down.

Stand-Off continues into Ryan Dean’s senior year, which should mean that he’s on top of the world but instead he is still haunted by last year’s tragedy. He fills in for stand-off after his best friend Joey passed away, and suddenly his entire team is counting on him. To make matters worse, he doesn’t even get to enjoy senior dorm privileges because administration decided to pair him with 12-year-old freshmen Sam Abernathy so he could “show him the ropes.” Ryan Dean is convinced the “Next Accidental Terrible Experience” is around the corner, and his paranoia is leaking into all aspects of his life, including his relationship with Annie.

Alrighty. Here we go. It’s almost difficult for me to review these books, Winger especially, because it’s just so good.

So instead, I think I’ll review Stand-Off and mention Winger thoughts and feelings along the way.

I despise contemporary series, so I had some hesitation about the book, but it’s by Andrew Smith so that hesitation was all of 0.2 seconds. Then I read the book. And I did have some legitimacy to my concern. I think Stand-Off is the worst book I’ve read by Smith– that being said, I still loved it. But I loved it less than Winger and 100 Sideways Miles and Grasshopper Jungle and The Alex Crow.

First of all, I had the initial distaste for contemporary sequels. Then I thought Ryan Dean was a bit of a jerk all the time. I’m all for well rounded and diverse characters, and I don’t think everyone should be likeable because a) that’s no fun and b) it’s not believable. But I think he went a little overboard with is meanness toward Sam Abernathy.

Also, I didn’t think the plot moved fast enough. Not saying that there’s supposed to be a lot of action or anything, but there were definitely parts that dragged. Like every rugby scene. In Winger, the rugby field was a backdrop for other things, a means for a team and games and excitement in Ryan Dean’s life. I felt like Stand-Off emphasized rugby too much. I didn’t want game coverage; I wanted Ryan Dean coverage! I think one of the reasons Stand-Off went slower is because I already know Ryan Dean from Winger, so there was less to learn.

Winger, on the other hand, turned the 400+ page book into a one-sitting read with its character development of Ryan Dean, trials of high school, and hilarious random events. Screaming Ned? I literally laughed out loud, which was embarrassing as I sat in the break room at work, but still. Funny stuff. I loved Ryan Dean’s humor and his cute comics. His narrative first-person voice made everything that much more entertaining.

Both books definitely have intense boy humor, so if you don’t like that kind of stuff… these aren’t the books for you. Apparently, I am a teenage boy, so I cracked up every time. Whoops?

But there’s this one thing in Stand-Off that I absolutely adored. It made me smile, or actually laugh, every single time it cropped up in the book, and Andrew Smith is all about repetition so it came up a lot. Whenever Sam Abernathy talked, or the Abernathy as Ryan Dean called him, Andrew Smith used very descriptive “said” verbs and vivid imagery. The Abernathy didn’t say it– or demand, or shout, or hiss or anything like that. The Abernathy gurgled.

Smith used descriptions for babies or toddlers whenever the Abernathy spoke, and it cracked me up. Or he would be described as a juice box or other childish and squeezable things to make him seem so cute and innocent that I just had to laugh.

Guys, there’s really no way to critique Andrew Smith’s writing. It’s beautiful. It’s descriptive. It’s funny. Even if I didn’t wholeheartedly like Stand-Off, I couldn’t deny the literary merit.

But I did wholeheartedly love Winger. I loved the ending. The commentary on the ridiculousness of social stereotypes and the realness of it all. Seriously, though. What I said before about crying? Weeping, really. That’s all true. It made me laugh and cry and everything in between. It goes on my list of all-time favorite books. It opened my door to Andrew Smith. It’s just beautiful. I emailed Andrew Smith I loved it so much. Whenever I think about this book

Anyway, I better wrap this up before I go on forever.

Winger by far surpasses Stand-Off, but I’m glad I got to catch up with Ryan Dean and make sure he was okay. It was good closure.

Read these books.

TONIGHT THE STREETS ARE OURS BY LEILA SALES

Arden can be described as “recklessly loyal.” When her best friend Lindsey gets herself into trouble, Arden is the first one there to pick her up or bail her out. She sacrifices things for the people she loves, but lately those sacrifices have felt less satisfying. Her picture-perfect mom walked out of their frame, and Arden starts to feel unappreciated by the ones she cares about most. She stumbles upon “Tonight the Streets are Ours,” a blog by Peter, an aspiring New York writer, that puts her own thoughts into words, when she searches, “why doesn’t anyone love me as much as I love them?” And when she drops everything and takes a road trip to find him, she has one crazy night that shows that not everyone is always as they seem.

I picked up this book on a whim at a Fierce Reads panel at Little Shop of Stories, and I started reading it looking for something quick and fluffy. Road trip? Love? Mystery boy? Typical, yes. And just what I wanted. Alright, so Peter and Arden will live happily ever after and she’ll find herself on the way. I’m ready.

That’s not this book.

That’s not this book at all.

And I instantly fell in love with the unpredictability and excitement between the covers of this seemingly average novel.

I mean, look at the front. It seems like a fru-fru love story if I ever did see one. And I can’t say I minded, either. Even before knowing it wasn’t typical, the first line had me hooked.

The story you are about it read is a love story.

If it wasn’t, what would be the point? 

These words literally made my breath get caught and my hands tense around the cover. Of course love stories are the only meaningful stories, I thought to myself. Of course, because, otherwise, what would be the point? These two little sentences still cause my skin to tingle and make me consciously stop everything.

The book is so beautifully written, in my opinion. I love the simplicity of everything paired with the teenage voice and flowery descriptions. It’s easy to read, and it’s relatable. There’s obviously deeper themes, but it’s still a cute contemporary book. I think her writing style perfectly contrasted these two ideas.

And then there’s the plot. The entirely unexpected plot. Yes, it’s a love story (obviously), but it isn’t just a teenage romance. It’s beautiful. It’s about love and what it means and who to love and how to love them. It’s about loving not being in love. It’s deep, bro.

The only real critique I have is that sometimes the themes were a little too obvious. Every single thing that happened had a purpose, foreshadowing or creating tension or paralleling other stories or symbolizing the themes. This was both good and bad. It caused more layers to the story to discuss and show how everything connects, but sometimes I needed the networking to calm it down a bit.

I really wasn’t expecting to fall so deeply and madly in love with this book, but I definitely did. It’s anything but average. It pushes the envelope of young adult contemporary romance, and I think it takes the genre one step closer into focusing less on teenage lovers and more on love and relationships in general.

BOOK REVIEW: THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD BY ZORA NEALE HURSTON

As a teenager, Janie’s grandmother married her off as quickly as possible to an old man with his prospects in his sixty acres. When she’s tired of being stifled by him, she runs away with a man she found on the horizon, Jody. When Jody claims Eatonville and becomes the mayor, he takes her voice and covers her hair. Finally, she meets Tea Cake after Jody’s death, and she realizes what it means to be in love.

Alright, I’ll admit it. I was completely bored in the beginning of this book. And I hated the dialect. And I didn’t really have any feelings toward Janie because to me, she seemed very papery.

I can’t tell you exactly where the transition happened or why, but somewhere toward the middle I realized that I actually really enjoyed reading this book.

First of all, after Janie’s initial marriage and into her second one with Jody, I understood the weight of her voice and the toll it took on her to muffle it. And I started to appreciate how Hurston set up the novel and characterized Janie. It was subtle. She wasn’t papery. She was smart.

One of the major topics Hurston explores is the power of language, and she shows this through Janie’s marriages and attitudes. She hardly talks at all while married to Jody, showing her position as less than him, while with Tea Cake, they have real conversations and her dialogue is scattered throughout the end of the novel. She uses the form of the novel, not giving Janie much dialogue to greatly increasing it, to show her transition from less than her husband to equal with him. By doing this, I mistook her silence for two dimensional, but really it means so much more because language and the lack thereof shows the inequality between genders and Janie’s strategies in her marriage.

It is written pretty much completely in dialect, but I quickly got used to it. I also think the dialect definitely adds to the story, making it more real and emphasizing her themes on the importance of language.

Otherwise, I felt like there was probably a lot of stuff in the book that I missed. Plot wise, it picked up when Jody got sick. There is a bit of a twist with Tea Cake that I wasn’t expecting, but I also neglected to read the back and am a cynic, so it probably wouldn’t be surprising to anyone else.

I really did enjoy the book, and I liked how it didn’t seem like a race novel. Sure, there was a subtheme concerning racism and how it can affect anyone, black or white, but it didn’t overtake the novel. The novel is a classic because of its themes on language and equality, not because it’s only directed toward one audience.

I definitely recommend it as an important classic that isn’t that difficult to read.

“She had waited all her life for something, and it had killed her when it found her.”